what is a review article

Review article

Dec 08,  · An article review is both a summary and an evaluation of another writer's article. Teachers often assign article reviews to introduce students to the 91%(). A review article is a text that contains the summary of scholarly research on certain topics. It can be regarded as a summary or evaluation of someone else's writing. Review articles are mostly written for articles of professionals to give an accurate summation of their work. An article review is written with an objective of giving a better understanding of a particular topic.

To advance evidence-based health care practice by providing search expertise, guidance and support for conducting systematic reviews and similar review methodologies at Temple University for artice medical and health sciences disciplines. You should "Work with a librarian or other information specialist trained in performing systematic reviews to plan the search strategy. The service includes a variety of review types. Please Note: The Literature Search Service requires a brief consultation with a librarian and the completion of our protocol form.

Search Strategy Critique Service:. Please contact the health sciences library to schedule an individual, small group or class educational session. However, their expertise does not reviwe the evaluation of evidence by a trained medical professional.

For questions about reuse of this guide please email stephanie. Many of our librarians are available to provide systematic review education. See all library locations. University Libraries. Search this Guide Search. What is a Rapid Review? What is a Scoping Review? What is a Mapping Review? What is a Meta-Synthesis? What is a Mixed Methods Review? What is how to config switch in gns3 Integrative Review?

What is an Overview of Reviews? What is a Review of Complex Interventions? What is a Diagnostic Test Accuracy Review? What is a Network Feview What is a Living Systematic Review?

Systematic Review Service Mission Statement To advance evidence-based health care practice by providing search expertise, guidance and support for conducting systematic reviews and similar review methodologies at Temple University for all medical and health sciences disciplines. Why work with a librarian? Search results provided to you with duplicates removed. If using Endnote results will be sent via an XML file. The full search strategies for each database are provided in an Excel Spreadsheet with the number of results before and after duplication removal and the last date searched.

The search whar can be now be deposited into TUScholarShare our institutional repository. All search and deduplication counts are provided for reporting in the Prisma flow chart. Assistance writing the search methodology section and search strategy appendices. Assistance with screening tools and procedures. Search Strategy Critique Service: have your search strategy carefully reviewed by a librarian with expertise in systematic review searching. Schedule an Instructional Session: Please contact the revidw sciences library to schedule an individual, small group or class educational session.

SR intake form for librarians use. Learning Outcomes. SR Service protocol how to avoid carpel tunnel syndrome Word version If you are unable to access the form, please complete this Word document and email it to Stephanie at stephanie.

Thank you for your interest in our service! Report a problem. Tags: integrative reviewliving systematic reviewmeta-analysismixed methods reviewnetwork meta-analysisoverview of reviewsqualitative reviewrapid reviewti what ever you like reviewSystematic Reviewsystematic review serviceumbrella review.

Temple University University Libraries See all library locations.

Literature Searches

Review articles are an attempt to summarize the current state of understanding on a topic. A review article re-presents previously published material, rather that reporting new facts or analysis. Review articles come in the form of literature reviews and, more specifically, systematic reviews; both are a form of secondary literature. A review paper is not simply a summary of literature you have reviewed. Be careful not to leave out your own analysis of the ideas presented in the literature. Synthesize the material from all the works—what are the connections you see, or the connections you are trying to illustrate, among your readings. Mar 30,  · Mixed studies review/mixed methods review. Refers to any combination of methods where one significant component is a literature review (usually systematic). Within a review context it refers to a combination of review approaches for example combining quantitative with qualitative research or outcome with process studies.

Last Updated: March 20, References Approved. This article was co-authored by Jake Adams. With over 11 years of professional tutoring experience, Jake is also the CEO of Simplifi EDU, an online tutoring service aimed at providing clients with access to a network of excellent California-based tutors.

There are 18 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 2,, times. An article review is both a summary and an evaluation of another writer's article. Teachers often assign article reviews to introduce students to the work of experts in the field.

Experts also are often asked to review the work of other professionals. Understanding the main points and arguments of the article is essential for an accurate summation. Logical evaluation of the article's main theme, supporting arguments, and implications for further research is an important element of a review. Here are a few guidelines for writing an article review. Education specialist Alexander Peterman recommends: "In the case of a review, your objective should be to reflect on the effectiveness of what has already been written, rather than writing to inform your audience about a subject.

If you have to write an article review, read through the original article closely, taking notes and highlighting important sections as you read. Next, rewrite the article in your own words, either in a long paragraph or as an outline. Next, summarize the article, followed by your opinion about whether the article was clear, thorough, and useful. Finish with a paragraph that summarizes the main points of the article and your opinions.

To learn more about what to include in your personal critique of the article, keep reading the article! Did this summary help you? Yes No. Log in Social login does not work in incognito and private browsers. Please log in with your username or email to continue. No account yet? Create an account.

Edit this Article. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Cookie Settings. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article parts. Sample Article Reviews. Related Articles. Article Summary. Part 1 of Understand what an article review is. An article review is written for an audience who is knowledgeable in the subject matter instead of a general audience.

Article reviews present more than just an opinion. You will engage with the text to create a response to the scholarly writer's ideas. You will respond to and use ideas, theories, and research from your own studies. Your critique of the article will be based on proof and your own thoughtful reasoning.

An article review only responds to the author's research. It typically does not provide any new research. However, if you are correcting misleading or otherwise incorrect points, some new data may be presented. An article review both summarizes and evaluates the article.

Think about the organization of the review article. Before you even begin reading the article you will review, you need to understand how your article review will be set up. This will help you understand how to read the article so that you can write an effective review. Your review will be set up in the following parts: Summarize the article. Focus on the important points, claims, and information. Discuss the positive aspects of the article. Think about what the author does well, good points she makes, and insightful observations.

Identify contradictions, gaps, and inconsistencies in the text. Determine if there is enough data or research included to support the author's claims.

Find any unanswered questions left in the article. Preview the article. Begin by looking at the title, abstract, introduction, headings, opening sentences of each paragraph, and the conclusion. Then read the first few paragraphs, followed by the conclusion. Then read the article in its entirety. When you read the first time, just read for the big picture — that is, look for the overall argument and point the article is making.

Make note of words or issues you don't understand and questions you have. Look up terms or concepts you are unfamiliar with so you can fully understand the article. Read about concepts in-depth to make sure you understand their full context. Read the article closely. Read the article a second and third time. Use a highlighter or pen to make notes or highlight important sections.

Highlight the main points and the supporting facts. Do: supplement the most important points with notes or cross-references. Put the article into your own words.

You can do this as a freewritten paragraph or as an outline. Start by putting the article in your own words. Focus on the argument, research, and claims the article makes.

What is the main point driving at? Don't: spend time on editing or phrasing. This is just for your own benefit. Do: write in a clear, logical structure to test your understanding. Write an outline of your evaluation. Review each item in the article summary to determine whether the author was accurate and clear. Write down all instances of effective writing, new contributions to the field, as well as areas of the article that need improvement.

Create a list of strengths and weaknesses. The strength of the article may be that it presents a clear summation of a particular issue. Its weakness may be that it does not offer any new information or solutions.

Use specific examples and references. For example, the article might have incorrectly reported the facts of a popular study. Jot down this observation in your outline and look up the facts of the study to confirm your observation. Think about the following questions to help you critique and engage with the article: What does the article set out to do?

What is the theoretical framework or assumptions? Are the central concepts clearly defined? How adequate is the evidence? How does the article fit into the literature and field? Does it advance the knowledge of the subject? How clear is the author's writing? Do: pay attention to your own biases, so you can overcome them. Part 2 of Come up with a title. This title should reflect the focus of your review. Decide between a declarative title, descriptive title, or interrogative title.

Cite the article. Under the title, place a complete citation of the article in the proper style. Don't skip a line between the citation and first sentence. Identify the article.

2 thoughts on “What is a review article

  • Torr
    04.10.2020 in 07:19

    Thanos s so is the beer

  • Fenriktilar
    07.10.2020 in 03:13

    But I was crying when song siyi was rejected

Add a comment

Your email will not be published. . Required fields are marked .

*
*